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What occurs at a hot spot?

A hot spot is an area on Earth over a mantle plume or an area under the rocky outer layer of Earth, called the crust, where magma is hotter than surrounding magma. The magma plume causes melting and thinning of the rocky crust and widespread volcanic activity.

What is a hot spot give an example?

In geology, the places known as hotspots or hot spots are volcanic regions thought to be fed by underlying mantle that is anomalously hot compared with the surrounding mantle. Examples include the Hawaii, Iceland and Yellowstone hotspots.

What causes melting at a hotspot?

A hot spot is a region deep within the Earth’s mantle from which heat rises through the process of convection. This heat facilitates the melting of rock. The melted rock, known as magma, often pushes through cracks in the crust to form volcanoes.

Is there fire underwater?

Regular fire, i.e. wood or paper burning – no. Because there isn’t enough oxygen to start or sustain regular combustion. But there are kinds of combustion which work underwater. You can light a strip of magnesium, and the combustion actually produces oxygen, which is then used to sustain the combustion.

Which countries are on the Ring of Fire?

The Pacific Ring of Fire stretches across 15 more countries including Indonesia, New Zealand, Papa New Guinea, Philippines, Japan, United States, Chile, Canada, Guatemala, Russia and Peru etc (fig. 3).

Where is the most active area in the Ring of Fire?

The world’s highest active volcano is Ojos del Salado (6,893 m (22,615 ft)), which is in the Andes Mountains section of the Ring of Fire. It forms part of the border between Argentina and Chile and it last erupted in AD 750.

Where do most volcanoes form at?

Sixty percent of all active volcanoes occur at the boundaries between tectonic plates. Most volcanoes are found along a belt, called the “Ring of Fire” that encircles the Pacific Ocean. Some volcanoes, like those that form the Hawaiian Islands, occur in the interior of plates at areas called “hot spots.”