Press "Enter" to skip to content

What must pyruvic acid be converted to before it can enter the citric acid cycle quizlet?

What must pyruvic acid be converted to before it can enter the citric acid cycle quizlet?

Glycolysis produces pyruvic acid, which enters the mitochondrion. There, it is converted to acetyl CoA, which enters the citric acid cycle.

What must be available before the citric acid cycle can begin?

The citric acid cycle takes place in the matrix, or inner fluid of the mitochondrion. However, before the citric acid cycle can begin, acetyl CoA must be produced. Acetyl CoA is created from pyruvate (the end product of glycolysis) during pyruvate oxidation.

What happens before the citric acid cycle?

During the first step of the citric acid cycle, the acetyl group from acetyl CoA is transfered to oxaloacetate to form citrate. Citrate then undergoes four more reactions to form succinate, along with producing two molecules of carbon dioxide, two molecules of NADH, and one ATP.

Why does the citric acid cycle need oxygen?

The function of the citric acid cycle is the harvesting of high-energy electrons from carbon fuels. Oxygen is required for the citric acid cycle indirectly inasmuch as it is the electron acceptor at the end of the electron-transport chain, necessary to regenerate NAD+ and FAD.

Where does the citric acid cycle occur?

Glycolysis takes place in the cytoplasm. Within the mitochondrion, the citric acid cycle occurs in the mitochondrial matrix, and oxidative metabolism occurs at the internal folded mitochondrial membranes (cristae).

What inhibits the citric acid cycle?

The citric acid cycle is regulated primarily by the concentration of ATP and NADH. The key control points are the enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. α-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase is inhibited by succinyl CoA and NADH, the products of the reaction that it catalyzes.

What are the redox reactions in the citric acid cycle?

The eight steps of the citric acid cycle are a series of redox, dehydration, hydration, and decarboxylation reactions. Each turn of the cycle forms one GTP or ATP as well as three NADH molecules and one FADH2 molecule, which will be used in further steps of cellular respiration to produce ATP for the cell.