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What document is the plan for our government?

The Constitution of the United States

What document created our first plan for government?

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union

What are the 4 documents?

Along these lines, therefore, a list of “the Four Major Founding Documents” that could be studied in class might be: 1) the Declaration of Independence, 2) the Constitution, 3) the Bill of Rights, and 4) the Federalist/Anti-Federalist Papers.

What was the first national government document called?

The Articles of Confederation

When was the first government created?

1781

What could the Articles of Confederation do?

The Articles of Confederation created a national government composed of a Congress, which had the power to declare war, appoint military officers, sign treaties, make alliances, appoint foreign ambassadors, and manage relations with Indians.

What was wrong with the first Constitution?

A tax protest by western Massachusetts farmers in 1786 and 1787 showed the central government couldn’t put down an internal rebellion. It had to rely on a state militia sponsored by private Boston business people. With no money, the central government couldn’t act to protect the “perpetual union.”

What are the five ways the Constitution can be changed?

This vital process of constitutional change by means other than formal amendment has taken place—and con- tinues to occur—in five basic ways: through (1) the passage of basic legislation by Congress; (2) actions taken by the President; (3) key decisions of the Supreme Court; (4) the activities of polit- ical parties; …

Why is it a bad idea to make a constitution too easy to change?

Any proposal to amend the Constitution is idle because it’s effectively impossible. The founders made the amendment process difficult because they wanted to lock in the political deals that made ratification of the Constitution possible.

How long does it take to change the Constitution?

Perhaps the most enlightening statistic to answer this question is that, excluding the Bill of Rights and the 27th Amendment, 9 out of remaining 16 amendments took less than one year to be ratified by the States after being passed by Congress, with an average of 17 months.