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What are the sources of information in the Internet?

Internet Sources. There is a phenomenal amount of information available online, via web-pages, blogs, forums, social media, catalogues and so on.

Is everything on Google Scholar peer-reviewed?

Unfortunately Google Scholar doesn’t have a setting that will allow you to restrict results only to peer-reviewed articles. If you find articles in Google Scholar, you would have to look up the journal the article is published in to find out whether they use peer review or not.

How do I know if it is peer reviewed?

If the article is from a printed journal, look at the publication information in the front of the journal. If the article is from an electronic journal, go to the journal home page and look for a link to ‘About this journal’ or ‘Notes for Authors’. Here it should tell you if the articles are peer-reviewed.

How do you tell if it is a scholarly source?

The article is most likely scholarly if:

  1. The source is longer than 10 pages.
  2. Has a works cited or bibliography.
  3. It does not attempt to persuade or bias the reader.
  4. It attempts to persuade or bias the reader, but treats the topic objectively, the information is well-supported, and it includes a works cited or bibliography.

Is the New York Times a peer reviewed source?

Some reputable sources: national newspapers (New York Times; Washington Post); large, popular magazines (Time; Newsweek); scholarly journals (peer-reviewed); and academic books (most of our non-fiction books in Gorgas are written by academics and scholars).

These are: Scholarly sources — intended for use in support of conducting in-depth research, often containing specialized vocabulary and extensive references to sources. Popular sources range from research-oriented [but lacking complete citations to sources] to special interest, agenda-driven publications.

What are the advantages of using scholarly peer reviewed sources?

The major advantage of a peer review process is that peer-reviewed articles provide a trusted form of scientific communication. Since scientific knowledge is cumulative and builds on itself, this trust is particularly important.

Why is a source important?

It gives proper credit to the authors of the words or ideas that you incorporated into your paper. It allows those who are reading your work to locate your sources, in order to learn more about the ideas that you include in your paper.