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What are the components of nucleotides?

A nucleotide consists of a sugar molecule (either ribose in RNA or deoxyribose in DNA) attached to a phosphate group and a nitrogen-containing base. The bases used in DNA are adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T).

What three components do all nucleotides have?

Nucleotides are composed of three subunit molecules: a nucleobase, a five-carbon sugar (ribose or deoxyribose), and a phosphate group consisting of one to three phosphates. The four nucleobases in DNA are guanine, adenine, cytosine and thymine; in RNA, uracil is used in place of thymine.

What are the components of each nucleotide quizlet?

Nucleotides each have three parts: phosphate, sugar molecule, and one of four bases. The bases include: A, (adenine), g (guanine), t (thymine), c (cytosine). The phosphate and sugar molecule bonds form the backbone or hand rail of the DNA (staircase), but the genetic key is in the steps (of the stairs): the bases.

What are the nitrogenous bases?

Nitrogenous base: A molecule that contains nitrogen and has the chemical properties of a base. The nitrogenous bases in DNA are adenine (A), guanine (G), thymine (T), and cytosine (C). The nitrogenous bases in RNA are the same, with one exception: adenine (A), guanine (G), uracil (U), and cytosine (C).

What are the nitrogenous base pairs?

The four nitrogenous bases are A, T, C, and G. They stand for adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine. The four different bases pair together in a way known as complementary pairing. Adenine always pairs with thymine, and cytosine always pairs with guanine.

What is the function of a nitrogenous base?

Not only is a nitrogenous base the building blocks for genetic information carrying molecules like DNA and RNA, but different forms of the nitrogenous base serve in various cellular roles from signal transduction to growing microtubules.

How genetic information can be stored in a sequence of nitrogenous bases in DNA?

Genetic information is stored in the sequence of bases along a nucleic acid chain. The bases have an additional special property: they form specific pairs with one another that are stabilized by hydrogen bonds. The base pairing results in the formation of a double helix, a helical structure consisting of two strands.