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What animals mourn their dead?

While most animals—even species thought to mourn—lose interest in a body after it decomposes, elephants famously pay homage to the bones of their kin. For two days, a western lowland gorilla (below) cradled and groomed her stillborn infant. “She tried to revive it, but she couldn’t,” says photographer Anup Shah.

Chimpanzees, gorillas, bonobos and orangutans show laughter-like vocalizations in response to physical contact such as wrestling, play chasing or tickling. … The differences between chimpanzee and human laughter may be the result of adaptations that have evolved to enable human speech.

Do any animals cry like humans?

Darwin thought monkeys and elephants wept. But modern scientists believe the only animal to really break down in tears is us. … ‘In the sense of producing emotional tears, we are the only species,’ he says. All mammals make distress calls, like when an offspring is separated from its mother, but only humans cry, he says.

Why do we cry when sad?

Research suggests that when you cry, your body releases endorphins and oxytocin. These natural chemical messengers help relieve emotional distress along with physical pain. In other words, crying is a self-soothing behavior.

Do animals get sad when their babies die?

Because mourning is not limited to big-brained cetaceans (whales and dolphins) or primates – scientists have documented some form of “death response” in seals, manatees, dingoes, horses, dogs, housecats, and more.

Do elephants feel love?

Elephants, the largest land animals on the planet, are among the most exuberantly expressive of creatures. Joy, anger, grief, compassion, love; the finest emotions reside within these hulking masses. Through years of research, scientists have found that elephants are capable of complex thought and deep feeling.

Do fish mourn their dead?

In general, grieving is unlikely in fish – unless you have individually bonded fish which might be possible in some species.

Can a fish feel pain?

Fish do feel pain. It’s likely different from what humans feel, but it is still a kind of pain.” At the anatomical level, fish have neurons known as nociceptors, which detect potential harm, such as high temperatures, intense pressure, and caustic chemicals.