Press "Enter" to skip to content

How does the sun produce wind and ocean currents?

How does the sun produce wind and ocean currents?

The heating of the Earth’s surface and atmosphere by the sun drives convection within the atmosphere and ocean. This convection produces winds and ocean currents. The greater the pressure differences between a low-pressure area and a high-pressure area, the stronger the winds.

Major surface ocean currents in the open ocean, however, are set in motion by the wind, which drags on the surface of the water as it blows. The winds pull surface water with them, creating currents. As these currents flow westward, the Coriolis effect—a force that results from the rotation of the Earth—deflects them.

When the Earth’s surface absorbs the sun’s energy, it turns the light into heat. This heat on the Earth’s surface warms the air above it. This moving air is what we call wind. It is caused by the uneven heating of the Earth’s surface.

How can we help ocean pollution?

How can you help our ocean?

  1. Conserve Water. Use less water so excess runoff and wastewater will not flow into the ocean.
  2. Reduce Pollutants. Choose nontoxic chemicals and dispose of herbicides, pesticides, and cleaning products properly.
  3. Reduce Waste.
  4. Shop Wisely.
  5. Reduce Vehicle Pollution.
  6. Use Less Energy.
  7. Fish Responsibly.
  8. Practice Safe Boating.

How can we help ocean acidification?

The most effective way to limit ocean acidification is to act on climate change, implementing solutions to dramatically reduce the use of fossil fuels. If we dramatically cut our global warming emissions, and we limit future warming, we can significantly reduce the harm to marine ecosystems.

What are the main factors that contribute to ocean acidification?

Ocean acidification is mainly caused by carbon dioxide gas in the atmosphere dissolving into the ocean. This leads to a lowering of the water’s pH, making the ocean more acidic.

What is the effect of ocean acidification?

Ocean acidification reduces the amount of carbonate, a key building block in seawater. This makes it more difficult for marine organisms, such as coral and some plankton, to form their shells and skeletons, and existing shells may begin to dissolve.