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How does the ocean affect us?

The air we breathe: The ocean produces over half of the world’s oxygen and absorbs 50 times more carbon dioxide than our atmosphere. Climate regulation: Covering 70 percent of the Earth’s surface, the ocean transports heat from the equator to the poles, regulating our climate and weather patterns.

What is the role of the ocean in climate change?

The oceans also regulate the global climate; they mediate temperature and drive the weather, determining rainfall, droughts, and floods. They are also the world’s largest store of carbon, where an estimated 83% of the global carbon cycle is circulated through marine waters.

How can bodies of water affect climate?

Large bodies of water change temperature slower than land masses. Land masses near large bodies of water, especially oceans, change temperature as the oceans change temperature: slower and with less extreme fluctuations than land masses farther away. Warm water also increases evaporation and ultimately precipitation.

Which of these is an example of how the ocean influences climate 3 points?

The oceans control the temperature by moving the hot air towards poles and cold air towards the equator. Ocean currents makes the colder air flow from the poles towards equator and hot air from from the equator to the poles.

Which of these is an example of the interactions between the ocean and the geosphere?

This is the example of erosion and deposition of sea sand to the shores and shows the interaction between the ocean and the geosphere.

Which statement best describes the energy transferred by water when it recycles in the atmosphere?

Which statement best describes the energy transferred by water when it recycles in the atmosphere? It remains the same throughout. A student designed an experiment to show how water is recycled through the atmosphere. The steps of the experiment are shown below.

What are the three water cycles?

The water cycle is often taught as a simple circular cycle of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation.