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How do plates move convection currents?

Convection currents describe the rising, spread, and sinking of gas, liquid, or molten material caused by the application of heat. Tremendous heat and pressure within the earth cause the hot magma to flow in convection currents. These currents cause the movement of the tectonic plates that make up the earth’s crust.

What three ways can plates move?

The movement of the plates creates three types of tectonic boundaries: convergent, where plates move into one another; divergent, where plates move apart; and transform, where plates move sideways in relation to each other. They move at a rate of one to two inches (three to five centimeters) per year.

What is plate movement in geography?

The theory of plate tectonics states that the Earth’s solid outer crust, the lithosphere, is separated into plates that move over the asthenosphere, the molten upper portion of the mantle. Oceanic and continental plates come together, spread apart, and interact at boundaries all over the planet.

Why do tectonic plates move Class 7?

(i) Why do the plates move? Answer: The movement of molten magma inside the earth results in the movement of plates.

What is the theory of plate tectonics Class 7?

Plate tectonics is the theory that Earth’s outer shell is divided into several plates that glide over the mantle, the rocky inner layer above the core. The plates act like a hard and rigid shell compared to Earth’s mantle. The earth’s lithosphere is composed of seven or eight major plates and many minor plates.

What is called tectonic plates?

A tectonic plate (also called lithospheric plate) is a massive, irregularly shaped slab of solid rock, generally composed of both continental and oceanic lithosphere. Plate size can vary greatly, from a few hundred to thousands of kilometers across; the Pacific and Antarctic Plates are among the largest.

What is the difference between an oceanic plate and a continental plate?

Oceanic plates are formed by divergent plate boundaries. Continental plates, meanwhile, are formed primarily by convergent plate boundaries. These zones represent areas where oceanic plates collide with and plunge underneath continental plates – a process called subduction.