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Can sample evidence prove a null hypothesis is true?

Sample evidence can prove that a null hypothesis is true. The correct answer is False because although sample data is used to test the null​ hypothesis, it cannot be stated with​ 100% certainty that the null hypothesis is true.

How do you fail to reject the null hypothesis?

After you perform a hypothesis test, there are only two possible outcomes.

  1. When your p-value is less than or equal to your significance level, you reject the null hypothesis. The data favors the alternative hypothesis.
  2. When your p-value is greater than your significance level, you fail to reject the null hypothesis.

When we reject the null hypothesis which of the following is true?

When doing hypothesis testing, two types of mistakes may be made and we call them Type I error and Type II error. If we reject the null hypothesis when it is true, then we made a type I error. If the null hypothesis is false and we failed to reject it, we made another error called a Type II error.

How do you test the null hypothesis?

The steps are as follows:

  1. Assume for the moment that the null hypothesis is true.
  2. Determine how likely the sample relationship would be if the null hypothesis were true.
  3. If the sample relationship would be extremely unlikely, then reject the null hypothesis in favour of the alternative hypothesis.

What is the relationship between type I and type II errors?

A type I error (false-positive) occurs if an investigator rejects a null hypothesis that is actually true in the population; a type II error (false-negative) occurs if the investigator fails to reject a null hypothesis that is actually false in the population.

How do you interpret a Type 1 error?

A type I error occurs when the null hypothesis is true, but is rejected. Let me say this again, a type I error occurs when the null hypothesis is actually true, but was rejected as false by the testing. A type I error, or false positive, is asserting something as true when it is actually false.

Which error is more dangerous?

The short answer to this question is that it really depends on the situation. In some cases, a Type I error is preferable to a Type II error, but in other applications, a Type I error is more dangerous to make than a Type II error.

What are the 3 types of error?

Basically there are three types of errors in physics, random errors, blunders, and systematic errors.